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Author:
• Monday, November 10th, 2014

For those of you looking for daily updates visit my Facebook page at  Jerrilyn Schembri Area E Peace River Regional District.

I was asked to name three things I would like to be remembered for accomplishing over the next four years, if elected, and why.
1. I would like to be remembered as being someone who genuinely cares for the people of Area E. I have lived in the Peace for 25 years, this is my home. I want to be part of making this area the best it can be.

2. I want to be remembered as a person who found positive solutions to difficult problems. I want to be remembered as someone who listened to the people and worked with them to bring their vision to fruition, and not as someone who imposed my vision on them.

3. People moved to Area E for a specific reason and I think it is instrumental that we work as a regional board to maintain that quality of living. I want to be remembered as a person who worked well with staff, residents, and all levels of government to accomplish this.

Only 5 days until the general election! Does anyone have any other thoughts on what I could be doing to reach people? I am phoning, my cards are at the community centre restaurant, social media, signs, radio ads, coffee talk and REMEMBER my open house on November 10th. Let me know if you have any other ideas. I really appreciate all of you spreading the word as well.

Tuesday I will take a day off to pay regards to those who fought for us so that we would have the freedom to vote. These brave men, women and fallen heroes represent the character of a nation who has a long history of patriotism and honor – and a nation who has fought many battles to keep our country free from threats of terror.

My Grandfather World War II.

Author:
• Monday, October 27th, 2014

Nothing prepares you for receiving a call from your child telling you she’s been diagnosed with cancer. But that’s the call I received from my daughter, who is the mother of three, just under 2 years ago.

Then, an urgent phone message eight months later from the hospital that my father had fallen and hit his head and they were not sure he would make it…a bleeding brain.

Life is easy when you are dealt all good cards but it is when you get a bad hand that you learn about who you are, what is truly important and the importance of serving family and community. I will come back to this.

I have lived in the Peace for the past 25 years and am honored to have been elected as Electoral Area E Director for the Peace River Regional District board. I sit on numerous boards as part of this role.

This past year I was elected to the North Central Local Government Association board, representing Area E and the PRRD regionally. I also represent Area E on the Union of British Columbia Municipalities board. This gives us a voice at the Provincial level. Federally I sit on four standing committees including Rural Communities and Remote and Northern Communities committees giving us a voice at a federal level.

These are all great things that benefit the area but it is the life lessons learned rather than the jobs we hold, that make each of us who we are today. Who we are determines how we serve. The events I spoke of earlier have reinforced some essential lessons which inform both my personal life and my public service.

1. Don’t ever give up! Make mistakes. When you are making mistakes you are trying new things, learning new things, living, pushing yourself and changing your world.

2 Don’t be afraid to admit those mistakes. We’ve all seen what happens when politicians try to deny the mistakes they make.

3. Play is important …it rejuvenates us but also allows us to contemplate the improbable/impossible…it lays the groundwork for innovation and possibility.

4 Stand up for what you believe in. If you don’t, how can people expect you to stand up for the issues they believe in. Be passionate about what you do!

So here I am, running for re-election in Area E and I am passionate. I have had three years to learn about the issues we face and the strategic goals of the Regional District. I’m ready to commit to another four years of listening to you, and advocating for the issues that impact all of us.

I grew up in a rural environment and my heart is rural. Area E is my priority, representing you is my priority. I do it full time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. On November 15 I ask you to please put an x beside Jerrilyn Schembri on your ballot.

Author:
• Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

From a wonderful resident of Area E:

November 15 those able to vote in the PRRD Electoral Area E elections I strongly urge you to vote for the voice of Jerrilyn for director ,Electoral area E , a strong , confidant voice for you .She has supported Area E thus far giving her heart and soul to the voice of our communities and has brought the north to the forefront of many a round table by representing area E by being the voice of the people that has deserved to be heard for many years now . I strongly urge you to drop her a line or give her a phone call just spending a few moments with this amazing woman who truly backs area E fully and completely with a passion and drive for growth and forward thinking and you will be able to see and hear in her voice the passion she has for this area . When you speak to her and hear all of the things that have been accomplished in the time she has been in as Area E director , you cannot help but leave the conversation with a zest and excitement for what’s to come. On November 15 vote JERRILYN.

Author:
• Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

Author:
• Wednesday, October 15th, 2014


Author:
• Tuesday, October 14th, 2014

The time to put your papers in for the upcoming Local Government Elections closed on Friday.  I have two people running against me for Area E.  I would like to thank them and wish them enjoyment during the campaigning period.  It is always great to get out and meet the residents and answer questions.

Today I had a PRRD Emergency Committee meeting to review our Emergency Plan.  Trish and Jill do an awesome job of the Emergency Management side of things for the RD.

Tomorrow I head off to Moberly Lake for a meeting.  I always enjoy catching up with the people there and the drive is beautiful.

Author:
• Wednesday, October 01st, 2014

Today I filed my papers for Electoral Area E.  i have been so fortunate to have spent the last there years as the Area E Director, representing the rural residents.  The election is coming up in November so six weeks till BC residents will be given a chance to elect their representatives.  Best wishes to all of those who have chosen to put their names forward to serve their communities.

Author:
• Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

Literacy Legacy books collected at the NCLGA!

Fort Nelson Councillor Kim Eglinski doing resolutions.

Olympic medalist Denny Morrison giving keynote at the banquet.

 

Don Lidstone presenting keynote address.

Councillor Bruce Bidgood dreaming about being an Olympic athlete wearing Denny Morrison’s medal.

President of UBCM Rhona Martin giving her address.

 

Tables of delegates at the Pomeroy.

Local Government Auditor General presenting.
My hand…Denny Morrison’s medal

 

Author:
• Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

I had the privilege of running for and winning 2nd Vice President of the NCLGA.  Here is my bio from that campaign…

There is nothing that prepares you for receiving a call from your child telling you she’s been diagnosed with cancer.  But that’s the call I received from my daughter, who is the mother of three, just under 18 months ago.

Then, an urgent phone message 6 months later from the hospital that my father had fallen and hit his head,  a bleeding brain the doctors informed me and an uncertain rather hopeless prognosis.

Life is easy when you are dealt all good cards but it is when you get a bad hand that you learn about who you are, what is truly important and the importance of family and community.

I am the rural director for Area E  on the Peace River Regional District board, and a former a councillor for the District of Tumbler Ridge.  I sit on numerous boards, as all of us who are involved in public service seem to do, but it is the life lessons learned rather than the jobs we hold, that make each of us who we are today. The last 18 months has taught me some essential lessons which inform both my personal life and my public service.

1. Always be optimistic. You all know the things we face while involved in local government…face them with a smile, be positive and don’t give up. You got involved in serving the public for a reason…stay true to that and work hard at what you are doing.

2. Play is important …..it rejuvenates us but also allows us to contemplate the improbable/impossible like flying to Mars……it lays the groundwork for innovation and possibility.

3. Try something new! Make mistakes. When you are making mistakes you are trying new things, learning new things, living, pushing yourself and changing your world.   And then don’t be afraid to admit those mistakes. We’ve all seen what happens when politicians try and deny the mistakes they make. You’re only human, and if you deal with people on that level, on the level of our shared humanity, you’ll be surprised how generous and forgiving most people really are.

4. Appreciate the opportunity you have been entrusted with, to serve people.

So, here I am trying something new.  I am thankful to all of you for giving me  the opportunity to work with  Maxine, Karen and the board for the past three years I have learned so much and truly come to appreciate the work the NCLGA does.

I am excited to work with Oliver and the new board to develop a series of innovative initiatives including:

-the NCLGA Literacy Legacy

-Northern BC Advocacy Days

-building a series of in-house consultation capacities to assist local governments.

-forging new relationships with those companies who are investing in Northern BC (ie industry round-tables on technology, health, communications).

I look forward to continuing this exciting work serving as your second vice president.

Author:
• Saturday, December 28th, 2013

Wow, it’s hard to believe that 2013 has come and gone and we are moving into 2014.  I know that this whole moving into the New Year is just a man made idea but I think it is a good one.  I think we, as humans, need that date to put the previous year behind us and begin looking forward into new uncharted territories.

I, for one, are not sad at all to see 2013 go…it’s been a tough year in a lot of ways.  Many of you know that my dad has been very sick.  He went into the hospital back in May and was finally released in November, only to head back into the hospital a week later.  He was released Christmas eve and is back in his new assisted living apartment.

Here are some thoughts from my brother, who writes for our weekly newspaper in an article he entitled “Ode to Vern” :

 

“On Sunday, I called my father. A few months ago, he had valve replacement surgery on his heart, and I’ve been trying to call him more regularly. I haven’t been succeeding, because I always remember too late at night.

Even on Sunday, I called too late, and roused him out of bed. “I’d get up to talk to you,” he said, but I still felt bad for waking him, especially since he was planning on going on a drive the next day with his brother back to the area where he grew up.

He never made it. On Monday, he fell a couple times, banging his head fairly severely. He was sent to the hospital back in Saskatoon, where he lives.

He was diagnosed with a subdural hematoma, or bleeding on the brain. He became quite agitated, and they had to physically restrain him so he didn’t hurt himself or others.

The prognosis is … well, it’s not great. He has caused some damage to his brain, which is most likely permanent, and he’ll probably need long-term care. Controlling the bleeding is tough because he’s on medication to thin his blood for his heart. His left leg is not functioning properly, and they don’t expect him to be able to live on his own again. They also don’t know if he’ll be able to drive anymore.

This latter is crushing. My dad used to live in his vehicle. Working as municipal police, often on a force of one, dad would spend 10, 12, 14 hours a day in his car. He used to regale us with stories about his experiences driving. Like the time someone started to complain about his driving in a bucket-of-rust car he had in his younger days. “If you don’t like the way I’m driving,” said dad, pulling off the poorly-attached steering wheel, “you drive.”

When I was fairly young, dad got a job in Corman Park, which is the rural area surrounding the city of Saskatoon. We lived in a small farming community about half an hour’s drive away. He used to commute every day. Then he started keeping a place in the city, and came home half the time, then on weekends, and then he didn’t come home at all.

It was a natural progression, and I didn’t really note his absence any more than usual. Somewhere along the line, instead of dad coming home I started to go visit him, and more often than not, I’d spend the day riding along with dad in his police truck, accompanying him on chases, making the rounds. It was exciting.

And my dad? Dad was vital. He was everything you’d expect in a cop. Big. Barrel chested. Just and gruff and not prone to smiling, but possessed of a sly sense of humour that would leap out at the most unexpected moments.

His pinky finger was bent at a 90 degree angle at the first knuckle for most of my young life. It happened, he said, after a high speed chase with one of the young punks round my home town. When dad finally cornered the fellow, he got out of the car and began to run. Dad ran faster. He grabbed the kid by his collar, slung him over his shoulder, and stalked back to the car, twisting his pinky in the process. He didn’t even notice. When he did notice, he didn’t even bother going to the doctors.

It was only after years of it snagging on things that he finally went in to the hospital and told them to cut it off. It took multiple attempts for them to finally to knock him out. It took an effort just to anesthetize him.

Which is why the idea of him not being able to drive for himself, of him having to be kept in an assisted care facility is hard to accept. He is a passionately independent man, strong, capable, tough. He is not someone that needs help walking, living.

Mortality is a condition common to us all. I know this. Getting old, as the joke goes, is better than the alternative. But, as many of you out there know, it’s easy to know that, intellectually, it’s hard when it’s your own parent who you’re watching get old, watching the strongest man I know become weak and frail, and it puts me in a pensive frame of mind.”

 

Well, Dad’s prognosis has improved slightly.  I drove back and forth between Tumbler Ridge and Saskatoon 4 times this summer…first packing up my Dad’s apartment, the next time moving him into his new place, the third and forth just to check in on him and get him settled into his new place.  I blinked and summer was gone…I spent it on the road.

 

Amidst all of this the Regional District was faced with some pretty big issues this year, issues that took a lot of time and allowed me to get to know the people who elected me so much better. Thank you to all of the Area E residents who took the time to express their opinions to me and those who took the time to come up with a viable and workable alternative.  You make what I do so worth while.

 

I also want to thank the District of Chetwynd.  I appreciate the way we work together.  We accomplish so much because we work together.  The Right in-Right out was just one example of this.

 

I will leave you with a quote..my wish for all of you

 

“I hope that in this year to come, you make mistakes.  Because if you are making mistakes, then you are making new things, trying new things, learning, living, pushing yourself, changing yourself, changing your world. You’re doing things you’ve never done before, and more importantly, you’re Doing Something.  So that’s my wish for you, and all of us, and my wish for myself. Make New Mistakes. Make glorious, amazing mistakes. Make mistakes nobody’s ever made before. Don’t freeze, don’t stop, don’t worry that it isn’t good enough, or it isn’t perfect, whatever it is: art, or love, or work or family or life.  Whatever it is you’re scared of doing, Do it.  Make your mistakes, next year and forever.” – Neil Gaiman